Johannes Lenhard

Johannes Lenhard is currently a PhD candidate in Social Anthropology at King’s College, Cambridge. His research is focused on the intersection of alternative economics, social theory and the ethnographic study of homelessness and mental health. He tweets under @acjf37 and is the current editor-in-chief of KR.

Looking for the coin in the haystack

Australian Craig Steven Wright came out as the inventor of Bitcoin on May 2 but there are various reasons to doubt his claim. Johannes Lenhard gives a comprehensive overview of the accusations and speculates about potential reasons for the revelation. The best bet: business interests.

Dreaming about Paris

We are shocked about the attacks on Friday 13 because, for the West, Paris is an ideal city of love, equality and democracy. Being hit there shakes a misleading dream which we finally need to wake up from and adjust, argues Johannes Lenhard.

Home-Less

A home is never a static entity; it demands continuous making and re-making, both materially and spiritually. Such home-making requires work and creativity – something Johannes Lenhard found during his work with homeless people on the streets of London and Paris. As more and more of the world’s population become displaced in search of new and better homes, it is time we deploy the same work and creativity in re-thinking the very concept of ‘home’. This article is the first in a new strand investigating the topic.

Good without God. An Interview with Matthew Engelke.

Jonas Tinius and Johannes Lenhard interview anthropologist Matthew Engelke from the London School of Economics in this first piece for the new strand on the 'Good Life'. Building on earlier research on what it means to be good for a Christian, Engelke talks about achieving a good life and happiness as a secular humanist in Britain today. In short, such a good life emerges through debate, contemplation, reason and argument - always in relation and conversation with others - and it comes now, in this world, as part of this life's happiness. Engelke provides us with starting points to explore important questions about wellbeing, ethics, and a good life - without god.

Heroin and the stainless steel plane of the spoon

In the Flummox-column, Johannes Lenhard narrates Michael's story begging, scoring and shooting heroin on the streets of London. Michael is an addict who cares for his drug, but he has reasons for this: on the stainless steel plane of the spoon, the drug cares back - something that he was denied all his life.

Money on either side of the poverty line

In the first column in the series Flummox curated by Polly Dickson, Johannes Lenhard juxtaposes two different ways of dealing with money, with cash. Diving into two 'everyday' encounters, he reflects on his personal observations among rich and poor. Wildly abstracting from the intricacies of the situations, he is surprised how the former are paradoxically afraid of cash, while the latter feel connected through touching, polishing, collecting and playing with coins and notes.

How the North can learn from the South in building a welfare state

A recent UC Berkeley #GlobalPOV video with professor Ananya Roy demonstrates that the issue of welfare dependency is just as bad among the middle classes and corporations as it is among the poor. KR editor Johannes Lenhard extends the case to Britain and links it up with recent ideas on the Universal Basic Income and the development of new welfare states in Asia and South America in this small blog-post.

The palaver about Channel4’s Benefits Street and the significance of a Universal Basic Income

How could a version of the Universal Basic Income as debated in Switzerland potentially fuel a debate about the problems in the British benefits system? Commenting on Tobias Haeusermann's recent article in the KR, Johannes Lenhard illustrates the case with his own research among homeless people in London and the current controversies about Channel4's program Benefits Street.

‘Catch it and talk to me’ – Flirting Tehran Style

There are things happening in Tehran that even by Western standards are almost too creatively subversive to be true. And they are happening in the vehicles that Tehranis covet. During 'rounding' - a form of car-speed dating - the intimacy that is typically banned from anything but the most private nocturnal spaces is partly able to return during sneaked daytime moments.