LESSONS FROM THE BANLIEU – BETH EPSTEIN

LESSONS FROM THE BANLIEU – BETH EPSTEIN
KR SALON PARIS
24 Oct 2015

Join us all for our second event at Berkeley Books in the KR Salons series, this time with Beth Epstein (NYU Paris). Beth will be giving a short introduction to her research on the French suburbs which have long been a source of political and cultural strife. Particularly now post-Charlie Hedbo, how can we better explore ideas of cultural diversity in contemporary France to reconsider the problems – and potential – of the French banlieue?

Biography:

Beth Epstein attended Princeton University as an undergraduate, where I majored in anthropology. After graduating she tried to break into documentary filmmaking and was only too pleased to learn of a new program in film and anthropology at NYU that inspired her to head back to graduate school. In the early 1990s she worked as co-director on the documentary film Kofi chez les Français, about a man of Togolese origin who was elected mayor of a small village in rural Brittany, which would eventually become the subject of her dissertation, namely, the politics of integration as they are practiced in France and, more broadly, concepts of race between France and the US. By 1998, she was already working for NYU-Paris.