fabrice le nezet

The Elasticity of the Artwork: An Interview with Fabrice Le Nézet

Chris Townsend, Aug 18th

The artist Fabrice Le Nézet’s latest sculptural works, exhibited online in a number of photographs, are distinctive works — not least because they do not exist in real life. This has been the cause of significant confusion (and, in some cases, embarrassment) for art critics. Chris Townsend had the chance to speak to Le Nézet about this work, the nature of truth and lies in art, and the relation of artist to critic.

Recent articles

Tracking Keynes through King’s: Economics, Genes and the Possibilities for Our Grandchildren

William Hoffman, Jul 29th

In a famous essay he published in 1930, John Maynard Keynes predicted a future of material abundance and abundant leisure. Keynes’s essay has resurfaced today with the growth of automation and high levels of unemployment. In the interim his fellow King’s graduates advanced and chronicled the scientific and technical improvements that Keynes wrote characterize the modern age. In this essay, William Hoffman tracks computer genius Alan Turing, the technology entrepreneur Hermann Hauser, Charles Nicholl, who wrote a biography of Leonardo da Vinci, and the science journalist Nicholas Wade.

Thinking Through Activism, Sexuality, and Scholarship

Tom Boellstorff, Jul 23rd

How can we respond to the challenges of combining activism and scholarship in regard to the topic of sexuality? This question is important when, in the context of continuing worldwide inequality, queer activists cannot allow governments and corporations to be the only entities acting at the global level. In particular, how are activists and scholars who are in some sense Western work for goals of social justice and make use of their privilege without having that privilege detract from the work of non-Westerners? In this article Tom Boellstorff discusses three possible strategies for responding to this state of affairs, based on his own experiences in Indonesia and elsewhere.

Did Somebody Say … George Orwell?

Owen Holland, Jul 15th

Owen Holland reviews 1984, Robert Icke and Duncan MacMillan’s stage adaptation of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, a co-production between Headlong, the Nottingham Playhouse theatre company and the Almeida Theatre. It will continue to run at the London Playhouse theatre until August 23rd. This article elaborates the current political resonances of the production in the light of some twentieth-century co-optations of Orwell’s novel. It comments on the decisions made in adapting the novel for the stage, keeping half an eye on Yevgeny Zamyatin’s dystopian glass-world, the Bauhaus and Lionel Trilling.

Corporate Boards, Quotas for Women and Political Theory

Jude Browne, Jul 5th

Across Europe, the question of whether quotas should be enforced for the highest-ranking corporate positions as a means to addressing gender injustice is under vigorous discussion. Much of the debate has focused on the European Commission’s (2012) draft directive COM 614, which would place an “obligation of means” on listed companies to ensure that at least 40% of non-executive directors (or 30% of all directors) of each corporate board are female by 2020. Jude Browne (Director of the University of Cambridge Centre for Gender Studies) considers the philosophical arguments that underlie the main challenges to quota policy and concludes that a much greater emphasis should be placed on the structural causes of gender inequality in employing institutions. From this, Browne outlines the beginnings of an alternative quota policy: the Critical Mass Marker approach.

The Advent of Cryptocurrencies: A Reason to Rethink Currency in the 21st Century

Jens Wiechers, J. Amadeus Waltz, Manouchehr Shamsrizi, Jun 28th

Cryptocurrencies are another step in the evolution of a society in which mathematics and cryptography can replace or augment traditional trust-based centralized infrastructure in financial services and monetary politics. While flawed, they can serve as a catalyst for an important debate of the future of currency.

Related: read Johannes Lenhard’s analysis of alternative currencies.

Fueling crisis or driving change? Disentangling our relations with destructive industries

Ragnhild Freng Dale, Jun 15th

With climate change already unfolding across the globe, Ragnhild Freng Dale argues that it is high time we, as a planet and as a university, wean our energy systems off the addiction to fossil fuels. We need to cut our intimate ties to an industry profiting from the destruction of the planet.

‘Crisis ordinariness’: Grangetown, Middlesbrough

Joshua Oware, Jun 9th

People in Grangetown have always been told to look forward, encouraged to do so by the production of projects and spaces intended to carry hope. But what is it that they should look to? Joshua Oware describes how people cope living in a community that has been dragged between habit and shock, a community continually told to ‘look to a future’ that always fades into indeterminacy.

Butterflies, Mimesis and ‘The Double’

Polly Dickson, May 29th

Richard Ayoade’s film ‘The Double’ (2013) — based on the Dostoevsky novella of the same name — showcases the modern Doppelgänger: a figure who stems from a mimetic crisis. Mimesis, the urge to copy, to reproduce – in art, in nature, in all social interaction – is a project haunted by its own failure, by all the bits that copying leaves out. Ayoade’s ‘double’ figures out these left-overs. He’s a perfect copy, and he’s everything that isn’t: a figure made of semblance and alterity in equal measure, anxious proof of the phoniness of social identity and all our concurrent fears of replaceability and double-talk.

Accumulation and All That

Nicholas Mulder, May 26th

Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century raises a host of interesting questions about inequality and capitalist development. But how are his findings related to other trends, such as the rising equality of incomes at the global level? What use are grand-historical research projects to economists? And what is the importance of his plea for a smarter and more ambitious tax state?

The City as Canvas: Detroit, MI and the problem of American exceptionalism

Alison Fornell, May 24th

Alison Fornell interrogates the impulse to fetishize Detroit’s postindustrial urban landscape and its socio-historical implications in her article, “The City as Canvas: Detroit, MI and the Problem of American Exceptionalism.”

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The Blog

Australia’s refugee crisis and the normality of exception

Nkita SimpsonAug 17

The phantasm of the illegal asylum seeker has haunted Australian politics for the past fifty years. The measures successive governments have taken to tame the beast encroach increasingly on their human dignity. As the Abbott government introduces ‘Operation Sovereign Borders’, Nikita Simpson questions what happens when the exception becomes the norm.

“Can we do some real music now?” – Practice and the pursuit of perfection.

Anita DattaAug 10

If practice makes perfect, and nothing’s ever perfect, why practise? This piece considers the various different kinds of practice that go into making an adept and talented musician. Thinking through the problem from a range of viewpoints, from that of neurology to that of a six-year-old child, Anita Datta reflects on attitudes towards practice and considers the array of possible results.

Palimpsestic Townscapes: Gilbert & George’s Scapegoating Pictures

Aurélie PetiotAug 8

Gilbert and George’s new exhibition, Scapegoating Pictures for London, stirs controversy, as per usual: for going too far, by portraying their immediate environment and including, for the first time, many references to Islam. Are these criticisms as empty as their canisters of
laughing gas? What are these works really depicting?

Pro-sex, and anti-prison, but what about kink?

Sarah Stein LubranoAug 7

This June, Gay Shame, a radical queer anti-assimilation group, led a protest against a prison-themed kink party. They say they are ‘Pro-sex and anti-prison’ but neither they nor their opponents have a clear sense of what to say about kink itself.

Madcap

Polly DicksonAug 6

Madcaps and mad hatters: this piece stems from the feeling that there is something a little mad about a hat. Polly Dickson thinks about Magritte, and Carroll’s Hatter, and about seeing faces in things.

Abbott, Indigenous Australians and the Politics of Invisibility

Nkita SimpsonJul 30

Australia is often portrayed from within and without as the ‘Land of Milk and Honey’. With the new Abbott government in office, this fantasy has become politicised to the point of infatuation. Nikita Simpson questions what amnesia makes this possible. Beginning with the plight of Indigenous Australians, she questions if the mentality of Terra Nullius is by no means dead.

Tuning Into Each Other: Intimate Collaboration in Music-Making

Anita DattaJul 27

Anita Datta explores the elusive procedure by which musicians come together to create the special and emotional product of human culture we call music. How do people singing in a choir, for instance, come to affect and respond to each other in the process of creating music?

How to Look at War: Michael Gove and the Fitzwilliam Museum’s La Grande Guerre

Anna BlairJul 25

Exhibitions marking the beginning of the First World War are almost mandatory in British museums this year. At the same time, the question of how to remember or examine the events of 1914 has caused division, particularly following Michael Gove’s criticisms of academic history. In this article, the first in the new column ‘Picture Politics,’ Anna Blair looks at the Fitzwilliam Museum’s La Grande Guerre and the ways in which the prints on display serve as an exercise in examining detail, both attracting the viewer and deepening their awareness of the horrors of war.

Deirdre Bair, Simone de Beauvoir, and The Undivided Woman

Sarah Stein LubranoJul 24

Simone de Beauvoir is famous for her work on feminism, but Deidre Bair’s biography suggests that de Beauvoir’s relationship with philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre was fraught with jealousy and self-sacrifice. Sarah Stein Lubrano writes that we shouldn’t be surprised.

Money on either side of the poverty line

Johannes LenhardJul 22

In the first column in the series Flummox curated by Polly Dickson, Johannes Lenhard juxtaposes two different ways of dealing with money, with cash. Diving into two ‘everyday’ encounters, he reflects on his personal observations among rich and poor. Wildly abstracting from the intricacies of the situations, he is surprised how the former are paradoxically afraid of cash, while the latter feel connected through touching, polishing, collecting and playing with coins and notes.